Category: Uncategorized

Partners buys into Rhode Island: I'm quoted in the Boston Globe

April 20th, 2017 by

Partners HealthCare plans to purchase Care New England in Rhode Island. Not a surprising move, considering  that Partners wants to continue to expand but is running into roadblocks in Massachusetts. Rhode Island is practically down the street.

I’m quoted in the Boston Globe’s coverage (Partners to acquire R.I.’s Care New England)

“This is a logical move for Partners, which has received strong pushback in its recent attempts to expand in Massachusetts, but is less likely to face the same pressures in Rhode Island,” said David E. Williams, the president of Health Business Group, a Boston consultancy. “The acquisition is geographically close to Partners’ existing network, and they already have a clinical collaboration. Rhode Island regulators will likely appreciate Partners’ financial strength and the stability it is likely to promote.”

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

USPSTF adopts my reasoning on PSA screening for prostate cancer

April 13th, 2017 by
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Which way on PSA?

I oppose over-testing and over-treatment, so I really had to think hard five years ago when I turned 45 and my doctor offered PSA screening for prostate caner. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) had just come out against PSA screening, concluding that the harms outweighed the benefits.

Nonetheless (Why I decided to get a PSA screening test for prostate cancer), I did go forward. As I wrote:

I know that PSA is a very imperfect indicator. I definitely want to avoid the stress and possible discomfort of having a biopsy. I’m worried about false positive and false negative biopsy results. And I don’t relish the significant potential for incontinence, impotence, or bowel problems from treatment.

But at this stage of my life I am willing to accept a significant risk of morbidity in exchange for a small reduction in mortality risk, which is my impression of what my choice to have the PSA test means. In 10 or 20 years I probably won’t feel that way. And I hope there will be better detection, follow-up and treatment options by then.

I’m also confident in my ability to make informed choices with my physicians along the way. The PSA test itself was done as part of routine blood work and there was no additional risk from that. My doctor and I agreed that if the PSA is elevated we’ll discuss what to do next. At that stage I’ll also have the chance to do more research and get more opinions if necessary. I’m not automatically going to get into a cascade of follow-up and treatment.

Now the USPSTF appears to be coming around to my way of thinking. In particular, they note that more men are choosing “active surveillance,” i.e., keeping a close watch rather than jumping straight to aggressive treatment.

The choice about whether to undergo PSA testing and what to do once results are in is a great opportunity for shared decision making. And this is what should be encourage.

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

What if the FDA is eliminated?

February 1st, 2017 by

President Trump’s first couple of weeks have people taking him literally, not just seriously. What does that mean when it comes to the regulation of drugs?

As I wrote in early December (Would an FDA radical make any real difference), I’m not convinced that even a major shift away from regulation will dramatically change the market. Even if the bar for approvals is lowered, third-party payers will still want to see compelling safety and efficacy data before they provide reimbursement. Medicare and Medicaid may also up their game by directly or indirectly discouraging prescribing of medications that are unproven.

The pendulum tends to swing back and forth between the demand for speedy approval and concern about harms to patients from inadequately tested drugs. Recently the pendulum has been swinging toward fast approval, and the newly enacted 21st Century Cures Act continues that trend.

But what will happen when a drug that’s rushed to market causes patient injury and death?

“We’re going to be cutting regulations at a level that nobody’s ever seen before. … And we’re going to have tremendous protection for the people — maybe more protection for the people,” Trump said Tuesday.

Trump is promising the impossible, and it may come back to bite him. Then again, maybe it won’t.

Goodbye Obamacare? More like hello single payer!

November 10th, 2016 by

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Once Donald Trump enters office, Republicans will be in a good position to repeal Obamacare, something they have been foaming at the mouth to do for quite some time. Democrats might be able to filibuster to prevent an outright appeal, although the majority has other ways to gut the law, such as the reconciliation process.

I say let them go ahead and repeal Obamacare without putting up a big fight. As Trump told 60 Minutes, “I am going to take care of everybody. Everybody’s going to be taken care of much better than they’re taken care of now.” He also promised to provide “quality, reliable, affordable health care.”

I look forward to hearing the great ideas revealed by Trump and the Republicans in Congress. If they can do what they say then I’m entirely in favor of it and will give them the credit that’s due.

Meanwhile, I’m going to feel free to criticize the stock initiatives of the Republican party, which were largely mirrored in Trump’s campaign statements:

  • Repeal Obamacare, by which they really mean keeping the popular pieces like making health plans accept members with pre-existing conditions without charging higher premiums, but at the same time jettisoning the unpleasant aspects such as the individual mandate and taxes that help subsidize coverage. Sounds nice, but without a mandate, plans will suffer from adverse selection, premiums will skyrocket, and people will be left uninsured
  • Let health plans sell insurance across state lines. This one is highly touted but in reality it’s a big yawn. The plans themselves have little appetite for moving across borders and even if they did, most new entrants won’t be able to establish strong enough negotiating positions in the markets to bring down premiums
  • Change Medicaid to block grants so states can do what they want with the money. This isn’t a terrible idea because it could allow states to more freely innovate and tailor Medicaid to meet local needs. In practice it’s likely to be used just as a way to screw the poor
  • Promote drug re-importation. Remember the senior citizen buses to Canada in the 1990s before Medicare Part D and the mail order pharmacies with drugs supposedly from Canada, that disappeared once Obamacare required drug coverage? Well, the GOP might bring these back. But the drug market has changed and the most pricey new meds won’t necessarily be attainable from abroad anyway
  • Let individuals who buy their own health insurance take a tax deduction the way businesses already do. Again, sounds great in theory but it’s a regressive approach that rewards higher income people who are in the top tax brackets. It also encourages premiums to rise and widens the budget deficit. The Cadillac tax or some variant that limits deductibility by businesses is more fiscally responsible
  • Expand Health Savings Accounts (HSAs), allow them to be shared among family members and passed on as part of one’s estate. Not a bad idea but hardly a game changer in its own right

Remember, thought, that the Republican ideas above were presented by conservatives, while Trump himself has been at least a liberal and frankly more of a socialist when it comes to health care policy, at least based on his earlier writings. Once he learns that the ideas of the conservatives in Congress won’t produce universal coverage, he may well go back to improving –instead of replacing– Obamacare, moving to a Canadian style single payer system, or opening up Medicare for all, just like Bernie and much more radical than Hillary.

I can’t wait to see how it all plays out.

Image courtesy of Thanamat at FreeDigitalPhotos.net


By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.