Category: Devices

Noisy hand dryers – how to cope? Hint: Lower you hands

published date
July 25th, 2019 by
fullerton02
Noisemaker in chief
fullerton03
Noise reduction nozzles. Anyone ever seen one of these in the wild?

Nora Louise Keegan, a 13 year old Canadian has generated great publicity with her recent article in Pediatrics & Child Health (Children who say hand dryers ‘hurt my ears’ are correct: A real-world study examining the loudness of automated hand dryers in public places).

She conducted a rigorous study to measure the peak loudness of dryers at two distances from the wall, both with and without hands in the dryer’s air flow. She measured the sounds at different heights, corresponding to the ear canal height of younger and older kids and of adult men and women.

I encourage you to read the article. It is brief and well-written.

When I saw the write-up in the Washington Post, I immediately remembered writing about this very issue back in 2013 (when the author was about 7 and starting to develop an interest in the topic).

In my post (Hand hygiene and hearing loss. Avoiding the tradeoff) I wrote:

I’m not so fond of the Excel Xlerator. Sure it’s powerful, but it’s also incredibly noisy. I have sensitive ears, and I’m not embarrassed to admit that when I’m exposed to a loud sound I cover my ears with my hands. But of course if I’m drying my hands I can’t use them to protect from the noise.The Xlerator is loud enough that I suspect it’s a threat to hearing. At the very least it’s so annoying that I bet some people skip hand washing to avoid using it. My gym has one of these beasts and after being bothered by it for a while I decided to research the noise level.

I didn’t do any original research but I found a paper by Jeffrey Fullerton and a colleague from an acoustical consulting firm and corresponded with Jeff about the subject. He told me that the airstream is a major factor in the noise level and advised me to lower my hands a foot or so below the nozzle , which helps make things quieter. This is the approach I use to this day, with some success –although sometimes the sensor doesn’t see my hands and it does take a bit longer to dry.

The new research by Keegan quantifies the difference made by placing hands in the airflow and also identified the Xlerator as the number one bad boy.

When I read the article I circled back to my original sources. The article I cited is gone (maybe the firm snuffed it when the author moved on) but the Acoustical Society of America still has a summary on its site.

My favorite tidbit is that there is (was?) a noise reduction nozzle for the Xlerator. Presumably the manufacturer understood there was a problem.

I’ve never seen one of these in use. Have you?

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

 

 

Off your walker? Foray’s founder Dr. Kavanagh takes a new approach to an old need (podcast)

published date
August 7th, 2018 by

What’s worse than needing help with gait, mobility and balance? Being told you need a walker. No wonder, when the typical walker basically screams “frail elderly,” and is difficult to use as well.

Neurologist Patricia Kavanagh was struggling to get her patients with Parkinson’s and other movement disorders to use a walker.  So she teamed up with a design and production team to found Foray and create the Spring, a modern device that is more functional and stylish.

In this podcast interview we discuss:

  • (0:13) Dr. Kavanagh’s clinical practice and the types of patients she treats
  • (1:19) Key challenges she faces working with patients with movement disorders
  • (3:24) Problems with current assistive devices like canes and walkers
  • (6:11)  Whether walkers are unique in their poor design
  • (7:26) The story behind the birth of Foray and the development of the Spring
  • (8:42) The target audience
  • (12:04) Price point for the new device
  • (12:50) The thinking behind the branding of Spring and Foray
  • (13:31) Potential line extensions
  • (15:20) Impact of burden of chronic disease on mobility and exercise tolerance

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

Reducing variance in medical device and drug utilization. Podcast with Lumere CEO Hani Elias

published date
March 26th, 2018 by
Lumere CEO, Hani Elias

To succeed in value based care, providers must reduce unwarranted variance in utilization and cost. Medical devices and drugs are good places to focus, since they represent big slices of the spending pie that are rarely optimized. In this podcast interview, Lumere CEO Hani Elias describes how his company deploys evidence based software and services to help health system clients take on variation.

Overview:

  • (0:12)What are some of the key challenges in healthcare?
  • (1:31) What do you mean by “unwarranted” variation?
  • (2:45) Are you able to tell which variation is appropriate and which is not?
  • (4:30) How does the decision making process differ between drugs and devices?
  • (6:42) Drug and device companies are large and are influential with physicians. How do you operate effectively in that environment?
  • (8:45) How do you differentiate from others who work on reducing cost and improving quality?
  • (10:30) What’s new, and what’s the same in this administration in Washington compared to the prior one?
  • (11:41) The company has a new name. Why?
  • (12:35) What does the future hold for Lumere?

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

eCOA in action: Podcast interview with iCardiac CEO, Alex Zapesochny

published date
March 6th, 2017 by
from-rbj-article-headshot-21
Alex Zapesochny, CEO, iCardiac Technologies

Electronic clinical outcome assessment (eCOA) platforms collect data from patients, clinicians and caregivers to make clinical trials more efficient and accurate. iCardiac Technologies, an innovative core lab where I am a board member, just introduced its QPoint eCOA platform to complement its existing cardiac safety and respiratory function product lines.

In this podcast interview, iCardiac CEO Alex Zapesochny shares more about the launch.

  • (0:11) What are some of the key trends you are following in clinical drug development?
  • (1:04) You started with cardiac safety testing and then added pulmonary function testing. How do those fit together?
  • (3:00) Now you have a new platform, QPoint. What is it, and why is it the next logical service?
  • (4:44) For those who are less familiar with eCOA, what is it? And what are some of the challenges that are typically encountered?
  • (7:09) Compliance is often an issue with patient reported outcomes. Do you address compliance with QPoint?
  • (10:30) How important is eCOA for drug development? Is it a major change or incremental?
  • (12:20) You have explained the move from cardiac safety to respiratory to eCOA. What can we expect next from iCardiac?

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

Podcast interview with Dexcom CEO Kevin Sayer

published date
November 15th, 2016 by
dexcom-bell-for-blog
Dexcom “Warriors” surround CEO Kevin Sayer on World Diabetes Day 2016

Kevin Sayer is CEO of Dexcom, and on World Diabetes Day he had the privilege of ringing the NASDAQ bell at the start of the session. I caught up with him afterwards to ask about developments in Continuous Glucose Monitoring.

Here’s what I asked:

  • (0:10) What is World Diabetes Day and what does it accomplish?
  • (0:45) Your company is a pioneer in Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM). What is the impact on patients?
  • (1:48) Does CGM replace finger sticks or do you have to do both?
  • (2:23) Is CGM relevant only for those with insulin pumps? Is it useful for people who inject insulin?
  • (3:24) What is an artificial pancreas? How does CGM fit in?
  • (5:15) How do you model the financial impact of CGM for individual patients and for populations?
  • (6:49) How important are online patient communities and data registries, such as T1D Exchange? Do they play an important role in your R&D?
  • (8:11) As we look to 2017 and beyond, what are the next big things we can expect?

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.