Category: e-health

Telehealth for nursing homes. Podcast interview with Curatess CEO Paul Knight

published date
August 24th, 2020 by
Paul Knight HeadShot
Paul Knight, Curatess Founder & CEO

COVID-19 has spurred a dramatic shift to telehealth. It’s also devastated nursing homes, which have suffered tremendous loss of life. But I’d heard very little about how nursing homes are using telehealth during the pandemic –at least until I spoke with the CEO of Curatess, Paul Knight.

In this podcast, Paul and I discuss:

  • How nursing homes became ground zero for COVID-19 infections and deaths
  • The role of telehealth in nursing homes during the pandemic
  • How the nursing home telehealth experience differs from the prototypical televisit
  • Best practices for nursing homes considering deployment of telehealth
  • How nursing homes will evolve during the pandemic and what role telehealth will play

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group

Telehealth, visualization and the pandemic

published date
August 6th, 2020 by
art.papier
Dr. Art Papier, VisualDx CEO

Infectious disease expert and dermatologist Art Papier is CEO of VisualDx. In this podcast interview we discuss the pandemic, telehealth, and racial disparities.

Here’s what we covered:

(0:13) Comparing today’s crisis with 9/11 and anthrax attacks
(2:06) Lack of preparation for COVID-19
(3:43) The all hazard approach to bio-preparedness
(7:04) Why COVID-19 hit the US so hard
(8:19) How the pandemic will end
(10:04) Role of virtualization in diagnosis
(13:50) What changes with telehealth
(15:58) Future potential of telehealth
(18:45) Impact of telehealth on equity and disparities
(21:08) What the future holds

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Interview conducted by healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group. Podcast production by Marina Zapesochny, social media intern.

What do patients think of virtual care? Interview with Kyruus’s Dr. Erin Jospe

published date
July 31st, 2020 by
Erin Jospe headshot
Dr. Erin Jospe, Kyruus CMO

Patients have been receiving a megadose of virtual care since March. How’s it going and what will it mean long-term? Provider search and scheduling company, Kyruus asked 1000 patients for their opinions and published the findings.

How Patients Learned About Virtual Care Options
How Patients Learned About Virtual Care Options

Kyruus Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Erin Jospe and I had a chance to catch up on the report and speculate about its implications in this podcast.

Here’s what we discussed:

  • (0:15) Key findings and surprises
  • (1:54) Baby Boomers’ affinity for virtual care
  • (3:40) Paradox that Baby Boomers are big utilizers of virtual care but not so likely to switch doctors to get it
  • (6:21) Downsides and limitations of virtual care
  • (10:55) Impact of virtual care on disparities
  • (13:47) Potential to launch a virtual-first practice
  • (17:31) Why Kyruus cares about these results

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Interview conducted by healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group. Podcast production by Marina Zapesochny, social media intern.

Elective procedures and the second wave of COVID-19

published date
June 15th, 2020 by
Jeff Fallon
Jeff Fallon, eVideon CEO

Hospitals need to perform elective procedures to make money, but with the first wave of the pandemic still in process and a second wave possibly on its way, patients are in no rush to return. In this interview, eVideon CEO Jeff Fallon opines on what’s ahead.

  1. Hospitals are currently preparing for a “second wave” of non-COVID-19 patients who were forced to delay care – but even though restrictions are easing, people may continue to stay away. How do you think this will impact hospitals? Patients? 

    Hospitals will surely welcome their revenues turning north towards normal as this begins. But it’s clear that many will still be concerned about the risk of infections. I read a new survey by the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography & Intervention, which showed that 61% of Americans over 30 years of age are more afraid of COVID-19 than a heart attack, and that 36% consider just going to a hospital risky behavior. With those kinds of stats in mind, hospitals are facing a new complexity in the level of trust with patients who so urgently need this delayed care. Patients will be looking for visible signs that the new normal for hospitals is tuned for their protection in a near post-pandemic reality. Things like ubiquitous PPE and hand sanitizer, hyper-clean environments, and use of new technologies that reduce risks of contagion will be vital evidence that gives confidence to the worried.

  1. How can provider organizations persuade patients it is safe/important to start coming back in for elective procedures and routine treatments?

    Many hospitals have developed tremendous marketing competencies and I expect they’ll do an amazing job in telling their communities about the important preparations they’ve made for this new normal. Those marketing messages are an essential start but even more important is the visible, tangible evidence of the commitment to safety when patients come back to the campus for care. They’ll surely tell two friends who tell two friends and so on as the slogan goes. Visible investments in new care tools like telehealth and virtual engagement solutions that enable excellent and thoughtful care from a healthy distance are examples of this. Touchless digital whiteboards that present vital information dynamically updated in the room is another.
  1. What role will digital engagement platforms have in helping providers communicate effectively with patients returning for care?

The usual face-to-face communication comes with risks which have become front page news during recent months of this pandemic. Digital patient engagement platforms enable patient understanding of their clinical condition through delivery of personalized video education and now live face-to-face communication via video visits. Now more than ever the ability to effectively educate and communicate from a safe distance is vital for hospitals that seek to deliver higher quality, more satisfying care than ever before even in a post pandemic world. But the urgency for this reaches a new high as worried patients return to healthcare campuses for the vital and necessary care they have put off while remaining in place.

  1. How will the bedside experience be different for patients post-pandemic? How can hospitals ensure the safety of patients and providers?

 Virtualization of many common processes like patient meal ordering, nurse rounding, patient feedback, room controls like temperature and lighting are a necessity post-pandemic. The mandate for satisfaction and quality of care isn’t going away, so the hospitals that thrive post-pandemic will be those that excel at using these kinds of digital tools to maintain high performance while minimizing potential for exposure. Visitation policies might never be the same again. But the urgent need for us all to feel closer to those we love only increases when health and lives are at risk. So the need will remain very high for virtual visits between hospitalized patients and loved ones who can’t enter the hospital or even for doctors and nurses to stay at a safe distance while they consult with those hospitalized patients and their families who may be anywhere in the world.

  1. How is eVideon helping hospitals improve patient engagement and education both inside and outside the hospital? 

eVideon’s core value proposition for decades has been to enable nurses to better engage patients in their own care through strong interfaces to core healthcare IT tools like the EMR. This has always been about automatically prompting patients to complete personalized video education prescribed by the care team for that patient based upon admission details. This virtualization has always afforded the nursing staff high levels of efficiency, but the pandemic made very clear that with this efficiency comes a newly-important safe distance. But we’ve also just launched eVideon HELLO, a virtual visit tool that enables hospitals to provide low cost video visits for their patients without the need for app downloads or account setups which have too often turned the nursing staff into tech support for business conference calling apps. Finally, we brand HELLO for hospitals so the patients clearly know who is making this incredibly important patient experience tool available to them.

  1. What are your recommendations for hospital executives who would like to support patients in managing their care during this time of crisis?

Go all-in on digital health tools that drive patient engagement. One doesn’t have to look past the front page of any newspaper, let alone the healthcare press to see that the businesses, (“brick and mortar” or otherwise) thriving through this pandemic are those leveraging strong digital strategies, and that will continue. And though the pandemic pushed digital/virtual to become a global business necessity, the delivery of care will not escape digital transformation after the virus abates. Hospitals that invest now in thoughtful digital health strategies will be best positioned to help nervous patients return for delayed care and they’ll be the providers of choice even beyond those who worry. Finally, new digital capabilities enable hospitals to meet more patients more efficiently wherever they are physically, emotionally or clinically; and that’s a smart digital strategy for today and forever.



By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

Can smartphones save us from coronavirus?

published date
January 29th, 2020 by
mouth guard 4787642 1280
Happy Chinese New Year!

A friend came home from a business trip to China on Friday. His kids (teens and tweens) were ready to hug and kiss him when he returned –as they usually do-, but when they heard his cough they fled to their rooms, slammed the doors and donned surgical masks.

Did dad bring the coronavirus home with him? Except for his wife, no one in his family was taking that chance.

Which got me thinking, what’s changed since the last epidemics of  Ebola, avian flu and SARS…?

For one thing, cell phones and the Internet have become ubiquitous. Bad news travels fast, and there’s no keeping the kids in the dark.

On the other hand, maybe smartphones can help keep us safe. For example, I’m impressed by ResApp, an Australian company that helps doctors diagnose respiratory illnesses by analyzing the data in coughs. Is it asthma, COPD, pneumonia, or nothing serious? ResApp uses the smartphone to figure it out. (Here’s my interview with the company from 2016.)

The tool is designed to be used by healthcare professionals (probably to keep regulators from getting nervous about self-diagnosis) but it seems to me that patients could use the app themselves and just send the data over the web for confirmation, avoiding the possibility of infecting healthcare workers and other patients.

Kids are about to go back to school in Australia after summer vacation/fire season (remember they’re on the upside down part of the world), and everyone’s nervous that coronavirus will show up in the classroom.

I asked ResApp CEO Tony Keating CEO for his opinion. He said

The identification and isolation of patients with viruses such as this novel coronavirus is a critical public health step. Like SARS and MERS, 2019-nCoV causes pneumonia – an infection of one or both lungs, causing cough, difficulty breathing and/or fever. People with these symptoms can be identified (in places like airports), isolated, and sent for further molecular testing. However this screening is difficult, as not all patients with the virus may have a fever at the time and infrared thermometers are not 100% accurate. These symptoms are also indistinguishable from the usual winter illnesses such as influenza. New screening tests which are rapid, accurate and portable could improve screening, and potentially reduce the global spread of these viruses.

Sounds promising to me. Let’s hope these new solutions can come online soon.

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By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.