Category: Entrepreneurs

Natural Language Processing: Podcast with Wired Informatics

published date
September 5th, 2017 by
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Murali Minnah, co-founder and chief strategy officer of Wired Informatics

Natural language processing (NLP) is a fascinating segment of Artificial Intelligence that draws on a variety of emerging scientific fields.   Wired Informatics is developing and commercializing NLP within the healthcare industry.

I met co-founder and chief strategy officer, Murali Minnah last year and we have been exploring  applications for NLP within Health Business Group’s client base. I admire the company and its approach, so asked Murali to share his insights in this podcast:

  • (0:11) You are involved with a lot of the hot buzzwords: big data, natural language processing, and machine learning. What do those words actually mean to you?
  • (4:59) Are there aspects of healthcare that lend themselves well to natural language processing?
  • (7:18) How well does NLP actually work today? What’s the trajectory for its development?
  • (8:42) How do you work with a technology that is good and improving but not perfect? In healthcare it seems we’d be concerned about something that isn’t perfectly accurate.
  • (10:59) If you do get to 100 percent accuracy, how do you contend with problems in the underlying data?
  • (12:50) You mentioned operational use cases as the first places to start. What are some of the most compelling use cases today and down the road?
  • (15:35) Where is your company getting traction? What use cases? What customers?

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

mHealth Israel founder Levy Shapiro shares plans for conference in Jerusalem

published date
August 21st, 2017 by

 

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Innovative Israeli technology companies have a huge impact around the world. Now, more of the country’s entrepreneurs are turning to connected health. mHealth Israel is at the center of this surge. Its upcoming mHealth Israel conference on September 14 will be the culmination of a nationwide week of activities.

I had planned to speak at the conference, but sadly won’t make it to Jerusalem this time around.

Levy shared his perspectives on mHealth in Israel and provided background on the upcoming mHealth conference.

  • (0:13) What’s the state of digital health in Israel? How does it differ from markets in the US and Europe?
  • (1:58) Israel is a small market and doesn’t trade much with its neighbors. Are most of these companies focused locally or are they looking at external markets?
  • (3:09) Describe the ecosystem. What is the typical interaction between the startup companies, hospitals and larger companies?
  • (7:10) What are some of the major themes you are seeing in health startups this year? Is it a change from the last couple years?
  • (9:38) What is mHealth Israel?
  • (11:30) You are running an Israel startup competition over the summer. What is it? When are the entries due?
  • (12:40) What are the highlights of mHealth week?
  • (14:02) Who are some of the speakers at the upcoming conference?

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

How to cure patient cancellations. Podcast with QueueDr CEO Patrick Randolph

published date
August 8th, 2017 by
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I can wait –if necessary.

It takes an average of 24 days for a new patient to get an appointment with a doctor, up 30 percent since 2014. In Boston, it’s 52 days! Physician schedules are full, and yet a significant percentage of appointments are canceled or patients just don’t show up –costing doctors billions in revenue and depriving needy patients of appointments.

These two things are related: with such a long wait the patient may either be cured on her own, go to the ED, die, or just forget about the visit.

Patrick Rudolph saw an opportunity to do something about this problem and started QueueDr to simply and automatically offer patients a chance to fill those open slots. You can listen to him explain in our podcast:

  1. (0:10) What problem are you addressing?
  2. (0:58) Why do you think the problem is getting worse?
  3. (2:25) Bad technology is a problem. What do you mean that your technology doesn’t require anything of the user?
  4. (3:44) What does it look like from the patient standpoint?
  5. (4:54) One of your customers says your product works “too well.” What is he talking about?
  6. (5:58) Do you think this cancellation issue is a standalone solution or should it be a feature in a broader system?
  7. (8:01) You’re not the first one to address scheduling and cancellation as a challenge. How do you compare with other approaches?
  8. (9:46) How would QueueDr work with a policy like charging patients who don’t show up or introducing an open access schedule?
  9. (11:58) Where will the company be five years from now?

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

Medial EarlySign: machine learning for population health (podcast)

published date
July 7th, 2017 by

Medial EarlySign analyzes standard EHR data to identify individuals at high risk for disease. The company’s first solution, ColonFlag uses longitudinal blood test data to identify patients who are at high risk for colorectal cancer.

I spoke recently with Medial executive Tomer Amit, who filled me in on the company’s approach and explained why the company has been named a Cool Vendor in AI by Gartner.

  • (0:15) What unmet need are you serving?
  • (1:05) You talk about using data that’s already available. What kind of data?
  • (3:02) When you mention “historical data” are you talking about longitudinal data for an individual patient or aggregated data for a population?
  • (4:18) Why is colorectal cancer an initial focus for the company, with your ColonFlag solution?
  • (5:13) Does ColonFlag replace colonoscopy or encourage someone to get one if they have an indicator that they are at greater risk?
  • (6:38) I see how it could help an individual. Would it actually help at the population level?
  • (7:45) You started in Israel and the EU, which have strong longitudinal medical records. Can the approach be applied in the US where that’s not the case?
  • (10:41) You have run your tests in different places around the world. Does the model differ by population or is there a universal algorithm?
  • (12:10) How do you protect your intellectual property? Once you are out there, are there just rules of thumb people can use instead of working with you?
  • (13:14) What traction have you gained with customers or partners? What industry recognition have you received?
  • (14:45) Are there other domains you are investigating beyond colon cancer? Other data beyond blood tests?
  • (15:58) What’s your 5-10 year vision of what’s possible and what Medial’s role will be?

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

HighRoads CEO Brian Kim talks next gen health plan product management

published date
May 25th, 2017 by

HighRoads helps health plans automate the creation of new products to help them get to market faster and more flexibly. It may sound like an arcane corner of the healthcare world, but in this podcast interview, CEO Brian Kim argues that his company’s platform is a game changer in the market.

Here’s what we discussed:

  • (0:15)What are the fundamental functions performed by health plans?
  • (3:40) Why has the process of defining and selling plans changed much more slowly than payment processing?
  • (10:29) What is needed to spur innovation on plan definition and selling within existing organizations?
  • (13:41) What’s the impact on these topics of action in Washington DC?
  • (15:46) What does HighRoads offer the market?
  • (18:02) Where are you getting the most traction?
  • (21:50) What can we expect on your road map over the next few years?

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By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.