Category: Health plans

Interview with Wolters Kluwer Health GM Frank Jackson

published date
July 22nd, 2021 by

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Frank Jackson, Wolters Kluwer

As the 6th of 7 children and a competitive athlete, Frank Jackson was well prepared for the rough and tumble of healthcare. After studying computer science and accounting, he pursued a variety of healthcare analytics roles before jumping into operations at HealthMarkets, where he helped the company pivot as the Affordable Care Act became law. At Prognos, he helped unleash the power of lab data on healthcare decision making. 

As General Manager at Wolters Kluwer Health, he’s deploying technology such as Natural Language Processing and code translation engines to help payers contend with the COVID-19 whipsaw.

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By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

ICER founder Dr. Steve Pearson explains COVID-19 remdesivir pricing model

published date
November 12th, 2020 by

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Dr. Steve Pearson

Drug pricing is the hottest topic in healthcare, and ICER founder Dr. Steve Pearson is the coolest person to discuss it with.

In this episode of the HealthBiz podcast, Steve describes how the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) compiles and analyzes clinical evidence to estimate the fair value of treatments for cancer and other serious illnesses. ICER has been especially active during the pandemic, developing a pricing model for remdesivir and other COVID-19 therapies that’s being used in the United States and by health technology assessment agencies around the world.

For fun, he has been reading Paradise Lost by John Milton.

This is the second episode I’ve recorded on COVID-19 drug pricing. Check out the first one: Remdesivir powers activate! with Dr. Surya Singh.

The HealthBiz podcast is now on SpotifyApple PodcastsGoogle Podcasts and  many more services, making it easy to subscribe.

Below is a rough (AI-generated) transcript of the episode.



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By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group

 

The 30 Years’ War for value-based care: Podcast with Archway’s Dave Terry

published date
October 22nd, 2020 by

When Dave Terry started his career in healthcare three decades ago, he noticed something odd and disturbing. The fee-for-service model meant doctors were paid for quantity, not for quality or cost effectiveness. Since then he’s been working to do something about it: for the first twenty years at American Practice Management, then Partners Healthcare and Harborside Healthcare. He made progress, but also learned the limitations of acting against entrenched interests.

For the last decade he’s gotten even more serious, co-founding Remedy Partners in the wake of the Affordable Care Act and then Archway Health, where he is CEO. Archway helps physicians jump into the meaningful risk-based payment models that are finally on offer from the Feds and private carriers.

I compared Dave’s quest to the Thirty Years’ War, but reminded him that there was a Hundred Years’ War, too, so he better gird himself.

The HealthBiz podcast is now on SpotifyApple PodcastsGoogle Podcasts and  many more services, making it easy to subscribe.

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By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group

Coordination of benefits. Which plan is primary?

published date
October 15th, 2020 by
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Get your act together!

I received a couple of ominous looking letters from Boston Children’s hospital, letting me know that my claim has “been suspended” by my insurance carrier, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts.

Unlike a couple months ago, when Blue Cross accidentally cancelled my family’s entire policy (oops!) while trying to remove an adult dependent at my request, this time it was due to a “coordination of benefits” issue.

Here’s the situation. Another dependent of mine is a college student in a different state. Our Blue Cross HMO doesn’t work out of state, so we buy an additional insurance plan from the college. (Also one more policy for varsity athletic participation, but that’s another story!)

When this dependent had services at Boston Children’s, we listed the Massachusetts plan as primary. But at least according to the BCBS MA rep I spoke with today, the out-of-state plan should be primary because my dependent is the subscriber, unlike on our family plan where they are listed as a dependent. So even though the out-of-state plan is likely to deny the Massachusetts claim as out-of-network, we need that denial first before submitting to BCBS MA. Make sense?

Oh, and to make things a little more complex, the rep said I need to ask the other plan if they follow the “standard coordination of benefits rules.” Apparently some student plans don’t.

What fun!

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By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group

How does COVID-19 change Medicare Advantage?

published date
June 29th, 2020 by

Medicare eligible Americans have borne the brunt of coronavirus. Some of the immediate impact on Medicare Advantage plans is obvious. They are covering telehealth and paying for acute hospital stays.

But there are longer term implications, too. Their risk adjustment scores are thrown off by the lack of visits. Certain supplemental benefits (think gym membership!) no longer sound so healthy, while others (meal delivery) become super valuable.

In this episode of #CareTalk, CareCentrix CEO John Driscoll and I lay it all out,