Category: Policy and politics

Coronavirus and the role of home health care

published date
March 24th, 2020 by

Home health has an important role to play in coronavirus. In the near term, clearing out hospitals to make room for acutely ill coronavirus patients means homecare needs to step up, and it’s important to keep moderately ill patients at home if at all possible. Eventually there will be reliable home testing for coronavirus, but sadly that day has not yet arrived –despite what you may have heard.

In this latest edition of #CareTalk, CareCentrix CEO John Driscoll and I discuss the latest on COVID-19.


By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

Coronavirus: We are all in this together

published date
March 20th, 2020 by

In this edition of #CareTalk, Carecentrix CEO John Driscoll and I discuss the impact of COVID-19 in the US and around the world.  John retracts his earlier claim that the feds are doing a good job, and we go on to discuss the fact that we’re all in this together, universal coverage is a sensible policy, science matters, and government can help.

We agree with Tony Fauci, who said, “If it looks like you’re overreacting, you’re probably doing the right thing,” and we also look for signs of hope on the horizon (or just over it).


By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

Don’t worry, be happy with your health plan!

published date
November 21st, 2019 by
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The Likes have it

Joe Biden said in a recent debate, “one hundred sixty million people like their private insurance.” I agree with Biden’s assessment that it’s foolish to advocate scrapping insurance companies as his rivals Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders want. It’s stupid politically to take such an extreme view and it’s also worth noting that other countries with nationalized health insurance (like the UK and Germany) have private insurers, too.

Still, what does it mean to say people like their private health insurance? I suppose I would be counted in that number. And, by and large I would say I do “like” my insurance, which is with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts. They cover the doctors and hospitals I want to use and the drugs my family takes. Their customer service is good. Their website is ok. They’re flexible in their approach to enforcing policies.

The problem is the cost, which soared to about $2800 per month for family coverage, even for a high-deductible plan. At a colleague’s suggestion, I switched to an even higher deductible plan –which is also one where you have to pay for your own prescription drugs within that deductible instead of the first-dollar coverage I had previously. So while the premium dropped by several hundred dollars a month, I ended up with a co-pay on a generic drug of over $1000 –which would have been $100 before.

And did I mention that since it’s an HMO I needed to buy separate insurance for a dependent who’s at school out of state? And that the out-of-state insurance doesn’t cover expenses arising from participation in college sports? So I had to buy a third policy.

I don’t really blame my health insurer for the high and rising premiums. The main driver is the price of healthcare procedures, which continue to go up. I’ve been healthy, but still routinely see bills for my care in the thousands of dollars that would cost hundreds at most in other places. Some of that cost is attributable to the paperwork burdens imposed by the plans.

Warren and Sanders have a point about problems with health insurers and the lack of universal coverage. But in my view, the real way to address problems in the US healthcare system is to build on Obamacare, focusing not just on coverage (which Obamacare provides, especially if Medicaid expansion is fully implemented), but also on the cost, efficiency, and appropriateness of the care provided.

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

 

 

Check out #CareTalk @HLTH2019

published date
November 7th, 2019 by

CareCentrix CEO, John Driscoll and I talk #CareTalk on the road to the HLTH conference in Las Vegas, where we interviewed some big names include Obamacare architect Zeke Emmanuel, Former CMS Administrator Andy Slavitt, Former Congressman Patrick Kennedy, Walmart Health exec Marcus Osborne, and Boston Children’s Chief Innovation Officer John Brownstein.

You can check out the whole series on the YouTube playlist.

The healthcare cost revolution will not be televised either

published date
November 6th, 2019 by
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Coming to a TV near you

The quote at the end of yesterday’s Boston Globe article (Consumers struggle to find information on health care costs, poll shows) made me laugh.

“We’re seeing more and more consumer awareness every year,” [an insurance executive] told the Globe. “It’s a revolution that’s occurring, but it occurs over time.”

When I read about this ‘revolution’ it brought to mind an expression/poem/song from long ago: The Revolution Will Not Be Televised! The timeframe for the healthcare cost ‘revolution’ is on the order of decades, and I don’t think anyone will be able to sit still for a TV show of that length!

Not surprisingly, the Pioneer Institute’s survey demonstrated that while people with commercial insurance are interested in obtaining  price information before receiving a healthcare service, they don’t often get it. Only 2 to 7 percent of people check costs on insurers’ websites, according to the Attorney General.

Although that number seems crazily low, it’s actually easy to understand once you consider the multitude of the barriers:

  1. Patients don’t know what services they’re going to need
  2. Choice of provider often trumps cost as a factor
  3. Their health plans may not reward or punish them for saving or spending more money
  4. Next year’s insurance premiums are unaffected by what they do this year
  5. Those with a high deductible plan are likely to blow through the deductible anyway if they have serious medical expenses
  6. Insurers’ cost estimators aren’t easy to use
  7. The estimates may not be accurate anyway
  8. People haven’t heard about the available tools

I’m an educated consumer with a high deductible plan but I don’t try to check the costs ahead of time.

So there’s no need to be glued to your TV (or other device) watching this ‘revolution.’


By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.