Category: Technology

Life Image CTO Janak Joshi discusses real world evidence (RWE) –podcast

published date
August 12th, 2019 by
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Real world evidence?

Real World Evidence (RWE) is becoming more important in US healthcare, but the fragmented system and lack of interoperability makes it hard to collect and analyze. In this podcast, Life Image CTO Janak Joshi discusses  the state of the field and how it’s evolving.

Overview:

  • (0:12) How would you describe the evolution of medical data?
  • (2:36) Real world evidence and real world data are becoming more prominent in healthcare –and for good reason. What are some of the challenges in assembling RWD and RWE? How can they be overcome?
  • (6:36) Is it really true that unstructured notes are becoming quantifiable and useful?
  • (9:46) There are major efforts by the US government and private sector to improve interoperability and end data blocking. You have groups like CommonWell and Carequality –now working together. What’s the current state of play and how are things changing?
  • (13:56) You talk about data brokers like Datavant and HealthVerity. How much of their success is because the US system is so broken? Do you see them having the same success elsewhere?
  • (17:31) Promoters of AI and Machine Learning –including Life Image—tout the opportunity to revolution healthcare with these new techniques. Is it for real or overhyped? And how does interoperability tie in?
  • (22:20) What are you most excited about over the next few years?

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

Interoperability in healthcare 2019: Podcast interview with Rhapsody

published date
March 19th, 2019 by

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Interoperability has a been a buzzword in healthcare for about a decade, but sometimes it doesn’t seem like we’ve gotten that far. In this podcast, Rhapsody’s EVP of Product & Strategy, Drew Ivan and I discuss interoperability: its past, present and future.

Here’s what we covered:

  • 0:20 What is interoperability anyway?
  • 2:50 Why do we hear about interoperability so much in healthcare? Is it an issues in other industries?
  • 5:11 How does interoperability in the US compare to the situation elsewhere?
  • 6:51 Does interoperability matter to patients?
  • 9:20 Has interoperability failed in the past? What new models are being tried?
  • 11:54 What’s the business model for interoperability?
  • 13:42 Are there any downsides? Does interoperability create any new problems?
  • 14:54 How will interoperability evolve in the coming year?

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

Amazon: Force the healthcare system to become patient-centric

published date
February 6th, 2018 by

The announcement that Amazon will work with JP Morgan Chase and Berkshire Hathaway to create a new healthcare organization for employees has health plans and providers running scared. Initial press coverage has focused on the impact of this group on the market value of CVS, United Healthcare and the like –but how many people really care about that?

CareCentrix CEO John Driscoll has the right idea when he suggests that Amazon should compel provider organizations to put the patient first –for real, not just rhetorically. His three specific suggestions are good ones: mandate self-service scheduling, introduce  a universal patient portal, and improve the quality of provider reviews. As simple and straightforward as those sound, they would require Amazon and its partners to overcome serious resistance. It will be fascinating to watch what happens.

Assuming Amazon can make those basic but challenging changes come to pass, I have two additional, ambitious suggestions to help patients:

  1. Ensure that patients receive clear, consistent, actionable follow-up information when they leave a doctor’s appointment or are discharged from the hospital.
  2. Use the full set of information available about a patient to anticipate their needs and help them navigate the system.

The first idea is a simple one, which should be happening anyway, and occasionally does. The challenge is to get the provider system to care enough about what happens upon discharge and provide the tools, training, information and support to enable more seamless and empowering transitions. I was shocked at how poor the discharge instructions were after my release from the emergency department a few months ago, after I was struck by a car. I received basically nothing and had to count on family and clients in the medical system to help me. I know I’m not the only one who’s had this experience.

The second idea is broader and vaguer, but starts to draw on the expertise of Amazon’s partners who are in the financial services and insurance industries and have a lot of information about their customers. The consortium could help patients chart their financial path through the healthcare system, helping them identify what insurance to select, how much to save in their HSA and FSA, and where and when to get their care. It could be a virtual concierge for patients, relying big data and machine learning to provide insights and continuous improvement.

If these suggestions were implemented they would have a high impact, even though they would not completely transform the system. It seems like about the right level for this group to shoot for. If they try to be bolder they will likely fail.

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By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

Telehealth for chronic conditions: Interview with Synzi CEO Lee Horner

published date
January 18th, 2018 by
Lee Horner, CEO, Synzi

Synzi is a new technology company focused on helping healthcare organizations provide virtual care. The Synzi platform enables on-demand video interactions, including for those with limited knowledge of English and for patients with hearing loss.

I sat down with Synzi CEO Lee Horner at last week’s JP Morgan Healthcare Conference to discuss telehealth and Synzi’s role.

Overview:

  • (0:10) People with multiple chronic conditions are responsible for much of the healthcare spending in this country. What are some of the key challenges they face in maintaining their health?
  • (1:18) What role can telehealth play? How does it work in practice?
  • (2:44) What populations are most suited to telehealth? Which less so?
  • (4:09) What’s the value of telehealth beyond the traditional nurse phone call?
  • (5:55) Who pays the bill? What’s the value proposition?
  • (8:03) Do you offer archiving of the video visits?
  • (8:47) When customers archive do they make the archives available to patients?
  • (9:30) Synzi is a new company but it came out of Stratus, which had language services as well as tele heath. How do those fit together?
  • (11:10) What does the future hold for telehealth for people with chronic conditions?


By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

Blockchain for healthcare: Interview with Fluree co-CEO Brian Platz

published date
November 14th, 2017 by
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Brian Platz, co-CEO of Fluree

SilkRoad Technology co-founder Brian Platz has turned his attention to blockchain, with Fluree, a new Public Benefit Corporation that has introduced a scalable blockchain database for decentralized applications. Fluree is not healthcare specific, but there is a lot of potential for blockchain.

In this podcast interview we covered the following:

  • (0:10) What is a scalable blockchain database and why is it important?
  • (1:58) What are some of the most pressing database needs in healthcare? How different are they from the issues faced by other industries?
  • (3:07) What are some of the healthcare use cases for Fluree?
  • (5:15) You mention transparency and consensus as key attributes of block chain. Does that contradict healthcare’s needs for privacy and security?
  • (6:35) Who will leverage the technology in healthcare? Who is likely to be left behind?
  • (7:46) What impact, if any, will healthcare consumers and patients see as a result of Fluree?
  • (8:51) Why is Fluree organized as a Public Benefit Corporation?

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.