Category: Technology

eCOA in action: Podcast interview with iCardiac CEO, Alex Zapesochny

published date
March 6th, 2017 by
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Alex Zapesochny, CEO, iCardiac Technologies

Electronic clinical outcome assessment (eCOA) platforms collect data from patients, clinicians and caregivers to make clinical trials more efficient and accurate. iCardiac Technologies, an innovative core lab where I am a board member, just introduced its QPoint eCOA platform to complement its existing cardiac safety and respiratory function product lines.

In this podcast interview, iCardiac CEO Alex Zapesochny shares more about the launch.

  • (0:11) What are some of the key trends you are following in clinical drug development?
  • (1:04) You started with cardiac safety testing and then added pulmonary function testing. How do those fit together?
  • (3:00) Now you have a new platform, QPoint. What is it, and why is it the next logical service?
  • (4:44) For those who are less familiar with eCOA, what is it? And what are some of the challenges that are typically encountered?
  • (7:09) Compliance is often an issue with patient reported outcomes. Do you address compliance with QPoint?
  • (10:30) How important is eCOA for drug development? Is it a major change or incremental?
  • (12:20) You have explained the move from cardiac safety to respiratory to eCOA. What can we expect next from iCardiac?

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

Is radiology doomed?

published date
October 7th, 2016 by
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Which path to take?

The radiology profession is a famously paranoid lot, often worried about encroachment on imaging from non-radiologists, competition from teleradiology, reimbursement squeezes, and more. Auntminnie.com is a good place to go to observe how these worries play out.

The latest article, Will machine learning turn radiologists into losers? is a case in point. It reports on a New England Journal of Medicine article that asserts that machine learning will replace radiologists. Images will be sent straight to algorithms, bypassing radiologists completely, they say. There are differences of opinion on how soon this will happen, but an appreciation that once the electronic tools are good enough they will be preferred.

As a patient I’m all in favor of faster, more accurate, and cheaper interpretation of images and if that means there’s no future role for radiologists, so be it. But actually what I hope is that radiologists start to assert themselves as diagnostic quarterbacks, helping to organize and analyze information from pathology, genomics, lab tests and physical examinations. They can work with teams of clinicians in new ways, to speed diagnosis and treatment decisions.

I am aware that some enlightened radiology leaders are already thinking in these terms. I hope the fears spurred by the development of machine learning will accelerate the movement.

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

Sutter's Dr. David K. Butler on EMR-enabled transformation

published date
July 21st, 2016 by
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Dr. David K. Butler

Dr. David K. Butler came to healthcare as a digital native, unwilling to accept the paper-based status quo. In about a decade he went from using Microsoft Word to make medical notes legible to being named Epic Systems Physician of the Year for his contributions to the field of EMR implementation and optimization.

Butler is VP of EHR Optimization and Transformation at Sutter Health. In this podcast interview, I asked him to share his opinions and expertise. You’ll hear interesting perspectives on workflow, video games, and more.

  • (0:13) You went into medicine to be a practicing physician. How did you get interested in EMRs?
  • (2:58) EMR implementation has supporters but also detractors. What do you say to people who complain that EMRs have ruined the practice of medicine?
  • (6:36) In a decade you went from your first insight on electronic record keeping to being name Epic Physician of the year. How did it happen? What does it mean?
  • (9:32) How do video games fit into your view of how an EMR should operate?
  • (12:50) You work near Silicon Valley. What are you seeing from startup companies there? How do you advise them?
  • (16:18) What changes do providers need to make in EMR utilization as they shift from fee-for-service to value based payments?

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

Scaling up bundled payments: Interview with Loopback Analytics CEO Neil Smiley

published date
July 6th, 2016 by
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Neil Smiley, Loopback Analytics CEO and Founder

Neil Smiley is CEO and Founder of Loopback Analytics, which supplies tools to providers to manage bundled payments. I asked him to comment on the growth of bundled payments and the role of analytics.

Why are hospitals hesitant to adopt bundled payment options?  What strategies can long-term care providers take to encourage bundled payment adoption on a large scale?

In most cases, a hospital’s financial responsibility ends upon patient discharge.  Bundled payments significantly lengthen the care episode, making hospitals responsible for the costs of downstream care partners.  The shift to value-based reimbursement from our current environment of fee-for-service represents a sea-change for the industry.  Decades of business practices, clinical relationships, payment structures and core competencies are being reevaluated in light of this new payment model.  Such evaluation and reflection takes time, and we are starting to see leading organizations embrace this challenge as an opportunity to develop differentiating capabilities.

Long-term care providers can help accelerate this process through proactive engagement with their hospital colleagues.  Hospitals will need better data from their post-acute care partners to have confidence that they can consistently deliver efficient care and strong clinical outcomes.  The long-term care providers that can demonstrate these capabilities pave the way for hospitals to better understand, trust and rely on the broader care delivery pathway they must manage with bundled payments.

What are the main benefits patients will reap from bundled payments?  

Bundled payments have the potential to significantly improve patient outcomes through better care coordination across providers and care settings.

Under a fee-for-service payment model, there is little financial incentive to help ensure a patient makes a successful transition to skilled nursing after an acute care stay, or ensuring that patient successfully transitions home after leaving a skilled nursing facility.

Under bundled payments, there is now an aligned incentive with providers across care settings to ensure transitions are clinically successful and financially efficient.  Patients are likely to get more help in navigating multiple silos of care, when participating providers are financially responsible for the cost of poor outcomes.

What factors are holding back scalability of bundled payments options?

Broader scalability of bundled payment options will be paced by the availability of accurate and timely data from network participants and workable frameworks for sharing risks and rewards among bundled payment partners.

At the national level, CMS has relayed its intention to aggressively advance pay-for-value reimbursement models, with bundles being a prominent example.  Ready or not, the expectation is that bundles will quickly expand to include additional conditions and broader mandated participation.

At a health system level, first movers that have invested in the tools, competencies and partnerships needed to succeed in bundle configurations will be courting more bundle opportunities to take advantage of their lead in the market.

What is the role of analytics in bundled payment? Can you provide an example?

Advanced analytics are absolutely essential to success in bundled payments.

Bundled payments require that different providers across the care continuum come together to consistently deliver a clinically successful and financially efficient episode of care.  Without deep knowledge of potential partners’ strengths and weaknesses, a bundled payment manager stands a poor chance in creating a winning network.

CMS provides data to healthcare systems, ranging from high-level quality ratings to detailed, individual claims records.  With effective application of data analytics, these sources of information, combined with data from network partners can be used to create the most effective care delivery network possible.

How will analytics advance over the next 5 years? 10 years? How do you measure progress?

Looking towards the future, we expect a pronounced shift from retrospective, historical analytics to prospective, predictive analytics.  The former allows healthcare systems to accurately assess their current and historical states, and is an essential component for improving operations.  The latter allows healthcare systems to avoid costs and adverse clinical events before they even occur.  The availability of real-time health data will continue to grow with the proliferation of digital monitoring devices. Machine learning and predictive algorithms are already establishing themselves in matching patients with appropriate resources based on a diverse set of data markers.  We foresee significant expansion on this front in the coming years.

With so many analytics solutions vendors out there how do you distinguish yourself?

Loopback Analytics puts analytics into action.  Loopback has an integrated technology platform that allows our clients to move from investigatory analytics to data-driven interventions, through a platform  that provides a closed loop feedback system to ensure executed actions achieve the expected impact.

It is only through such an integrated solution that healthcare organizations can be assured that the problem is understood, the appropriate actions executed and impact quantified.

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

In the future, will every job be a healthcare job?

published date
June 6th, 2016 by
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I’m here for your job

The US added 38,000 jobs in May, including 46,000 in healthcare. In other words, healthcare added more than 100 percent of the new jobs in the economy. That won’t happen every month, but it’s a pretty striking statistic.

What’s going on here?

I recently read The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies, which basically argues that almost all jobs –including highly skilled ones– will be wiped out by automation, robots and artificial intelligence. Case in point: truck drivers and taxi drivers, who will be replaced by self-driving vehicles.

Job destruction is happening today on a large scale. Manual laborers have been vulnerable for a long time, but professionals are now under threat as well. There’s little opportunity in previously safe jobs like bookkeeper and paralegal. I firmly believe that a big driver of Donald Trump’s popularity is the alienation felt by many workers –including skilled ones– whom the economy no longer really needs or won’t need soon. It’s easy to blame free trade pacts, Chinese, Mexicans, and our feckless political leadership, but technology is actually the root cause.

The two big exceptions to job loss are healthcare and education, sectors that have been very slow to match the innovation pace established by the rest of the economy. That’s kept costs high and rising. As a result, Americans are getting killed by healthcare and education expenses at a time that incomes are stagnant.

Healthcare is always 10-20 years behind the rest of the economy (I’ll let someone else speak for education) so we can expect continued robust healthcare hiring for some time.

If the jobless future described in The Second Machine Age really comes to pass, society will be in serious trouble. I really don’t like the author’s idea of addressing joblessness by paying everyone a guaranteed minimum income. Sure people need an income, but they also need purpose in life, which often comes from having something productive to do on the job.

As I’ve been saying for years –for example Welcoming immigrants and robots to fill the nursing shortage and Robots are coming and they plan to treat you like a moron –I do think healthcare will eventually catch up with the rest of the economy and healthcare jobs will go by the wayside. But maybe there will be enough lag time that we will in fact preserve and invent meaningful jobs in healthcare, and that the healthcare field will lead the next wave for the re-humanization of the economy.

Image courtesy of Geerati at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.