Tag: David E. Williams

Interview with Navigating Cancer CEO Bill Bunker

May 6th, 2021 by

Bill Bunker
Bill Bunker, Navigating Cancer CEO

Cancer is tough on patients and families. And while a whole array of physicians, health plans and pharma companies are poised to help, it’s a challenge to bring everyone together. Navigating Cancer focuses on enabling the best care for patients, with a particular emphasis on the 95+ percent of the time that they’re not in the office.

In this episode of the HealthBiz podcast, Navigating Cancer CEO Bill Bunker describes how the company is leveraging workflow, data and mobile to improve the care experience. We also discuss the promise of value based care for cancer and the challenge of medication adherence for oral oncolytics.

In his spare time, Bill’s been reading books such as When All is Said by Anne Griffin and Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders, which he describes as a messy and chaotic read –but worth the effort.

The HealthBiz podcast is available on SpotifyApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsYouTube and  many more services. Please consider rating the podcast on Apple Podcasts.


By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

Podcast interview with Papa CEO Andrew Parker

April 15th, 2021 by

Andrew Parker Papa
Andrew Parker, Papa CEO

Andrew Parker is a son of South Florida. He’s also the son and grandson of entrepreneurs and an independent spirit, so it was pretty clear what career path he’d ultimately pursue. Papa –which offers Family on Demand– was born from Andrew’s experience arranging a youthful pal for his own Papa, a fairly demanding guy, at least in Andrew’s telling. When Papa was pleased with the service, Andrew knew it would appeal more broadly.

After being selected for Y Combinator and raising investment funds, it was off to the races. Papa Pals have been providing companionship and help with everyday tasks, combatting loneliness, sustaining independence, and making life more fun. The newly launched Papa Health adds Papa Docs to the mix, helping seniors navigate primary care, urgent care and manage their chronic conditions.

In this episode of the HealthBiz podcast, Andrew and I discuss his early career in telehealth, the founding of Papa, and experiences during the pandemic.

Andrew didn’t grow up as a big reader, and he still prefers audio books to the printed word. His favorite book, Meditations by Marcus Aurelius is a classic in the true sense of the word.

Meanwhile, If your business needs strategy consulting support please reach out to me at dwilliams@HealthBusinessGroup.com. We have experience throughout healthcare and life sciences, including with real world evidence companies similar to CorEvitas.

Check out the rough (AI generated) transcript.

The HealthBiz podcast is available on SpotifyApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsYouTube and  many more services. Please consider rating the podcast on Apple Podcasts.


By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

Interview with CorEvitas CEO Raymond Hill

April 8th, 2021 by

Ray Hill photo 1582212832315
Ray Hill, CorEvitas CEO

Ray Hill grew up on a farm and took up rowing in college. So he’s always been a hard worker and an early riser. In this edition of the HealthBiz podcast, Ray brings us up to date on progress at CorEvitas. As CEO and Chairman he’s led the company’s expansion from a singular rheumatoid arthritis registry to a broader autoimmune and inflammatory company with registries, real world evidence, biorepositories, and patient engagement capabilities.

I was partial to the company’s former name, Corrona, but for some reason that one didn’t have the right connotations for the pandemic era. When not focused on CorEvitas, Ray continues to row and to cycle. And he’s also chair of Row New York, which combines rowing and academics for kids who not otherwise have access.  Ray is proud of Row NY’s 99% graduation rate from HS and 85% graduation rate from four year colleges, a remarkable record.

 Meanwhile, If your business needs strategy consulting support please reach out to me at dwilliams@HealthBusinessGroup.com. We have experience throughout healthcare and life sciences, including with real world evidence companies similar to CorEvitas. 

Check out the rough (AI generated) transcript.

The HealthBiz podcast is available on SpotifyApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsYouTube and  many more services. Please consider rating the podcast on Apple Podcasts.


By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

How vaccine success and fourth surge are connected. David Williams in the Boston Globe

March 31st, 2021 by

It’s counterintuitive: a fourth covid-19 wave is evident even as vaccine rollout accelerates. Conventional wisdom blames it on more contagious variants, pandemic fatigue, and states reopening too fast. There’s truth to all of that, but it overlooks the role that vaccination itself plays.

David Williams shared his thinking with the Boston Globe (CDC Director Walesnsky stresses ‘hope,’ not ‘doom,’ after touring Hynes Convention Center. Vaccinations are accelerating even as COVID-19 cases also rise.)

“As spring comes, people in their 20s are relaxing their behavior and going out to restaurants with their friends,” said David Williams, president of Health Business Group, a Boston management consulting firm. “They don’t have to feel as guilty about infecting them if Ma and Grandma have already been vaccinated.”

Now that the old are vaccinated, we need to make sure young adult vaccination is quickly ramped up. There should be plenty of vaccine available shortly to do so.

“This is the time when we’re going from scarcity to surplus,” said Williams of the Health Business Group. “People who are eligible are now getting appointments, even if they have to work a bit, and a lot more people are now eligible. It still feels tight. But in the next two to three weeks, instead of waking up at 1 in the morning to book an appointment, you should be able to do at 2 in the afternoon.”

 

How the new surge and vaccine success are connected

March 31st, 2021 by
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Catch a wave and you’re sitting on top of the surge

It’s counterintuitive: a fourth covid-19 wave is evident even as vaccine rollout accelerates. Conventional wisdom blames it on more contagious variants, pandemic fatigue, and states reopening too fast. There’s truth to all of that, but it overlooks the role that vaccination itself plays.

I shared my thinking with the Boston Globe (CDC Director Walesnsky stresses ‘hope,’ not ‘doom,’ after touring Hynes Convention Center. Vaccinations are accelerating even as COVID-19 cases also rise.)

“As spring comes, people in their 20s are relaxing their behavior and going out to restaurants with their friends,” said David Williams, president of Health Business Group, a Boston management consulting firm. “They don’t have to feel as guilty about infecting them if Ma and Grandma have already been vaccinated.”

It’s actually pretty straightforward. We’ve asked younger people to make severe sacrifices over the past year. A central argument has been that they are protecting their older relatives and others in society, who are at mortal risk if infected. Now that the old are largely protected through vaccination, the argument loses its logic.

Vaccine rollout priority has focused on reducing death and hospitalization. That’s why we started with the elderly. If we wanted to reduce the number of infections, we would have started with the young.

Now that the old are vaccinated, we need to make sure young adult vaccination is quickly ramped up. There should be plenty of vaccine available shortly to do so.

“This is the time when we’re going from scarcity to surplus,” said Williams of the Health Business Group. “People who are eligible are now getting appointments, even if they have to work a bit, and a lot more people are now eligible. It still feels tight. But in the next two to three weeks, instead of waking up at 1 in the morning to book an appointment, you should be able to do at 2 in the afternoon.”

Today’s news that the Pfizer vaccine seems to work well in kids and not pose safety concerns is also great news. We should vaccinate the whole population by summer if at all possible.

Image by Manie Van der Hoven from Pixabay


By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.