Tag: legalization of marijuana

E-cigarettes: the California Cooler of the 21st century

April 17th, 2015 by
Just a harmless, tasty treat?
Just a harmless, tasty treat?

If like me you came of age in the 1980s you remember the California Cooler, a sweet wine/juice combo that made it easy for kids to start drinking alcohol even if they couldn’t handle the “adult” taste of beer, wine or liquor. They were very popular at the time but I don’t recall anyone ever saying they were a healthy alternative to anything.

Fast forward 30 years to the e-cigarette era. New data show 13 percent of high school students use e-cigarettes. From the Boston Globe (E-cigarette use spikes among American teens)

In interviews, teenagers said that e-cigarettes had become almost as common at school as laptops, a change from several years ago, when few had seen the gadgets… A significant share said they were using the devices to quit smoking cigarettes or marijuana, while others said they had never smoked but liked being part of the trend and enjoyed the taste — two favorite flavors were Sweet Tart and Unicorn Puke, which one student described as “every flavor Skittle compressed into one.”

Policymakers are confused. E-cigarettes seem safer than smoking, and at least some people must be using them to try to quit. But my view is that at least for kids they lower the barriers to unhealthy behaviors by making drug use more like having a candy or soft drink. The FDA banned nicotine lollipops. Why is this different?

I’m concerned about this delivery method for nicotine, but I’m also worried about marijuana. E-cig entrepreneurs have been busy finding ways to use the devices to deliver THC, and there is a big rise in marijuana laced foods, so-called edibles or medibles. Let’s not fool ourselves and our kids by pretending these drugs are harmless treats.

Image courtesy of patrisyu at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

The Medical Marijuana Mess

August 27th, 2014 by

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The thin veneer of “medical” marijuana has been stripped away in Colorado, where stores originally providing remedies for patients have been quick to plaster themselves with new signs touting recreational use for all adults. (The signs above are among those I spotted this month in just one small town.) And while federal regulations and public pressure have largely kept alcohol and nicotine out of candy and other child-friendly, sugary products, the marijuana industry is moving in the opposite direction by offering an ever-widening array of pot-infused “edibles,” complete with approving coverage from mainstream media.

There’s room for debate on just how harmful marijuana is, but it definitely is harmful, especially to the developing brains of adolescents. Here’s my bottom line: marijuana should be decriminalized so that those who consume it for whatever purpose are not subject to arrest and imprisonment, with all the personal and societal costs that brings, but the widespread use of marijuana should not be encouraged. And that’s roughly where Massachusetts was before voters decided to legalize medical marijuana.

I think we’re fooling ourselves in Massachusetts by going down the route of approving medical marijuana dispensaries. Early experience has already demonstrated that some unsavory characters and losers are drawn into the business. And with public opinion running toward legalization, we should expect these dispensaries to become outlets for recreational marijuana within a few years, maybe sooner.

Let’s be honest with ourselves and act accordingly:

  • If marijuana is a medicine it should be tested like any other drug and approved by FDA. If that’s the case, physicians could prescribe it and pharmacists could dispense it. In fact, such drugs are on the market and in development
  • If marijuana is so safe and effective that it doesn’t need a prescription, it should be sold wherever –like Tylenol
  • If marijuana is a recreational drug like alcohol, with known harms but where we’ve opted against prohibition, we should let liquor stores sell it. They already deal with age verification and physical security of the product

Sad to say but I think we’re going to see widespread legalization of recreational marijuana over the next few years and that we’ll look back in a decade or so and realize it’s been a serious mistake of the same magnitude as the addiction and abuse epidemic that’s resulted from the expansion of legal prescribing of drugs like OxyContin for pain.

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By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams of the Health Business Group

Marijuana is not gay marriage

January 13th, 2014 by

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It’s tempting to draw parallels between the legalization of gay marriage and legalization of marijuana. A pollster is quoted in today’s Boston Globe (Marijuana advocates lay groundwork for legalization in Mass.) doing just that:

“Opinion is changing very quickly on marijuana,” said Steve Koczela, the president of the nonpartisan MassINC Polling Group. He said a number of 2013 national polls found, for the first time, that a majority of Americans favor legalization of the drug. The rapid change, he said, “mirrors, in some ways, the same-sex marriage shift that’s taken place over the last few years.”

And the parallels go beyond that. Decriminalization of marijuana as Massachusetts has done is akin to allowing civil unions. The next step: full legalization, is viewed as a natural evolution of tolerance.

But there are serious differences. Civil unions lead to gay marriage because the rest of the population has a chance to discover for themselves that gay couples are no threat to heterosexual families. Contrary to some irrational fears, children are not “recruited” into homosexuality just because acceptance of gays goes up and is enshrined in the law. Once gay  couples are accepted and not feared, it becomes an equal rights issue –civil unions confer only partial rights and there’s no rationale to withhold full rights.

Time will tell, but I expect that experience with marijuana legalization will be different. Marijuana use is a health threat. Legalization does make underage use more acceptable, increasing harm. It becomes harder for parents to keep their kids from using pot.

It’s not inevitable that marijuana laws will become more and more lax. Cigarette smoking is becoming increasingly restricted and less culturally acceptable. The latest frontier is over smoking in public parks. Trans fats are being legislated out of use. New York City’s drive to limit soft drink sizes is not as crazy nor unpopular as it sounds. And beverages that mix alcohol and caffeine have been pushed from the market.

The abuse of prescription drugs is finally starting to get the notice it deserves. Parents are waking up to the fact that their kids –and if not them, their kids’ friends– are awfully interested in what’s in the drug cabinet, especially if that includes painkillers like Vicodin or Oxycodone. Something similar will happen with marijuana: barriers to its use will fall when the stigma of buying it from a dealer is removed and when its purity and freshness can be guaranteed by the retailer. I don’t want to see that happen in Massachusetts or elsewhere.

Having said that I do support decriminalization so people’s lives aren’t ruined by a marijuana possession conviction and so law enforcement loses the incentive to pursue property seizures.

photo credit: Eric Constantineau – www.ericconstantineau.com via photopin cc

By David E. Williams of the Health Business Group.